TERENCE HANNUM

I investigate obsolescence by incorporating the dead media of the cassette tape in my work. This passing media has value for me because of its significance to death. Where with technology, one version destroys the past, one is momentarily celebrated while the other heads to a landfill. In my cassette tape collages, audio installations and artists books I dwell on the destruction of memory through the medium of cassettes. Then I take this memory and reconfigure its entrails into something new. I’ll collage the tape itself and adhere the tape and peel the mylar backing off to expose only the magnetic dust into a geometric mass of information. My hope is that it by referencing geometric forms borrowed from audio editing, j-card designs, and audio waveforms I can enhance a sense of the uncanny in the presentation of media as a flat surface to gaze upon so we can reconsider the ways with which we archive, memorialize and mourn.


Terence Hannum is a Baltimore based visual artist and musician who performs solo, with the avant-metal band Locrian (Relapse Records) and the dark synthpop duo The Holy Circle. He has had solo exhibitions at The Suburban (Milwaukee), TSA (Brooklyn), Guest Spot (Baltimore), Western Exhibitions (Chicago, IL), School 33 (Baltimore), Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Gallery 400 at UIC (Chicago, IL).  And in group shows at TSA (Brooklyn, NY), sophiajacob (Baltimore, MD), Allegra La Viola (NYC), City Ice Arts (Kansas City, MO) & Jonathan Ferrara Gallery (New Orleans, LA)

Obsolescence is important to me because it signifies a certain kind of death. This is a death that happens all of the time. When we get concerned with technology, one version destroys the past. One medium is better, more accurate, and another must fade away. Or be resuscitated from the brink. In my art I spend a lot of time destroying cassettes and reconfiguring their entrails into something new. I’ll collage the tape itself and adhere the tape and peel the mylar backing off to expose only the magnetic dust into a geometric mass of information. My hope is that it enhances a sense of the uncanny in its presentation of the media as a flat surface to gaze upon so we can reconsider informational time. In this reconsideration I tend to think it can draw into question the ways with which we archive, memorialize and mourn.